install theme

stfusexists:

faineemae:

queenofadodi:

Men had no problem violating women’s bodies while they had on corsets, petticoats and farthingales, so what the fuck makes you think a short skirt has anything to do with it? 

Men also have no problem violating women’s bodies while they wear a niqab, hijab and burqa, some of the most covered form of clothing. So basically, what the fuck makes you think clothes have anything to do with it?

Super relevant. 

(Source: morenamagia)

things girls are made to feel ashamed of -

  • having periods
  • choosing what they want to wear on their body
  • wanting to/not wanting to have sex
  • putting boys in the ‘friendzone’
  • standing up against misogyny
  • ruining a boy’s life by telling the police that he raped her
  • abortion
  • having hair on their body
  • not appreciating catcalls
  • not appreciating chivalry
  • having control over their own fucking body
stopkeystonexl:

people need to realize this.

"These days, before we talk about misogyny, women are increasingly being asked to modify our language so we don’t hurt men’s feelings. Don’t say, “Men oppress women” – that’s sexism, as bad as any sexism women ever have to handle, possibly worse. Instead, say, “Some men oppress women.” Whatever you do, don’t generalise. That’s something men do. Not all men – just some men.

This type of semantic squabbling is a very effective way of getting women to shut up. After all, most of us grew up learning that being a good girl was all about putting other people’s feelings ahead of our own. We aren’t supposed to say what we think if there’s a chance it might upset somebody else or, worse, make them angry. So we stifle our speech with apologies, caveats and soothing sounds. We reassure our friends and loved ones that “you’re not one of those men who hate women”.

What we don’t say is: of course not all men hate women. But culture hates women, so men who grow up in a sexist culture have a tendency to do and say sexist things, often without meaning to. We aren’t judging you for who you are but that doesn’t mean we’re not asking you to change your behaviour. What you feel about women in your heart is of less immediate importance than how you treat them on a daily basis.

You can be the gentlest, sweetest man in the world yet still benefit from sexism. That’s how oppression works."

captainkittysticks:

My naked body is not sinful or immoral. It is not dirty or bad or wrong. My naked body is not pornographic, obscene, or “slutty.”

My naked body is just a body.

Any negative ideas you have about a naked body are due to sexualizing bodies, and the idea that sex is a dirty thing.

Why are you offended by and afraid of your own anatomy?

Get over it.

My naked body is just a body.

"The trouble is that, for women, being “nice” often translates into putting up with things we should never put up with. How many times has some creep sat uncomfortably close to me on the bus and stared me down, yet I’m too afraid to just get up and move, lest I offend him?

We smile when we’re harassed on the street or hit on by jerks. We laugh at sexist jokes. We learn that when we have strong opinions, we’ll be called bitches and that if we get angry, we’ll be called hysterical. When we say what we want, we’re called pushy or aggressive.

Part of learning “ladylike” behavior is about learning to smile politely when someone is being crude. Femininity has long been attached to passivity and to being docile. Men fight, women giggle and fume silently."

-

Women And Girls Don’t Need To Be Told To Be Nicer | xoJane 

Don’t be afraid to offend assholes on the street.

(via intoxifaded)

pulpofiction:

Life hack: if someone makes a racist/sexist joke, say, with total seriousness, “I don’t get it, can you explain it”

Then watch them crash and burn

(Source: steinbecks)

radicalfeministuprising:

shesaid-she-said:
thechaoticmindofwriterj:
And they go on to tell us that girls suck at science and math. Fuck you misogyny.
what the fuck
fatoutloud:


I got the following in the mail this week from MissRepresentaion.org:


A recent study of mainstream magazines targeted at women, from Vanity Fair to Cosmopolitan, revealed a shocking lack of representation for women of color. Of the magazines surveyed since September 2012, over 82% of covers featured only white women. Marie Claire and Glamour, who combine to reach more than 4 million subscribers in the United States alone, each featured only one person of color in that time span.On magazines targeting men, it’s no better. Maxim had exactly zero women of color on its cover during the same time period. Furthermore, The New York Times reported last week that just 6% of models walking the runways during 2012’s “Fashion Week” were black.  The limiting ideal of beauty perpetuated by the media not only exalts particular body types and age groups, but dictates which colors of skin are considered beautiful and which are not. This impacts how all of us, including girls and boys, value ourselves and others.On Monday, a globally trending conversation on Twitter further pointed out the need for more inclusion and intersectionality in the movement towards gender equity. We can contribute to this change this week by asking publications like Marie Claire and Glamour to pledge to include more women of color on their covers in 2014.Tweet them today. Or contact the magazines here and here.Together, as a unified and diverse movement, our voices are louder and more effective!  
Onwards,Jennifer Siebel Newsom & The MissRepresentation.org Team



My first reaction was “Really? Who the hell is actually “shocked” by this?” If you’re “shocked” by this you need to wake the hell up. Seriously. 

My second reaction, is of course, to blog about it. Because, as fucking stupid as shit as it is to start out by saying “shocking lack of representation for women of color”  without meaning it to be intentionally sarcastic, the message behind the email is definitely one worth sharing. Hopefully the links are intact and working properly so you guys can do your thing to help in this. 

"One factor that makes interaction between multi-ethnic groups of women difficult and sometimes impossible is our failure to recognize that a behaviour pattern in one culture may be unacceptable in another, that is may have different signification cross-culturally … I have learned the importance of learning what we called one another’s cultural codes.
An Asian American student of Japanese heritage explained her reluctance to participate in feminist organizations by calling attention to the tendency among feminist activists to speak rapidly without pause, to be quick on the uptake, always ready with a response. She had been raised to pause and think before speaking, to consider the impact of one’s words, a characteristic that she felt was particularly true of Asian Americans. She expressed feelings of inadequacy on the various occasions she was present in feminist groups. In our class, we learned to allow pauses and appreciate them. By sharing this cultural code, we created an atmosphere in the classroom that allowed for different communication patterns.
This particular class was peopled primarily by black women. Several white women students complained that the atmosphere was “too hostile.” They cited the noise level and direct confrontations that took place in the room prior to class as an example of this hostility. Our response was to explain that what they perceived as hostility and aggression, we considered playful teasing and affectionate expressions of our pleasure at being together. Our tendency to talk loudly we saw as a consequence of being in a room with many people speaking, as well as of cultural background: many of us were raised in families where individuals speak loudly. In their upbringings as white, middle-class females, the complaining students had been taught to identify loud and direct speech with anger. We explained that we did not identify loud or blunt speech in this way, and encourage them to switch codes, to think of it as an affirming gesture. Once they switched codes, they not only began to have a more creative, joyful experience in the class, but they also learned that silence and quiet speech can in some cultures indicate hostility and aggression. By learning one another’s cultural codes and respecting our differences, we felt a sense of community, of Sisterhood. Representing diversity does not mean uniformity or sameness. "

-

Bell Hooks, Feminist Theory: From Margin to Center (pages 57-58)

Crucial to communication.

(via nezua)

(Source: ceedling)